Jul 182011
 

Changes in the way one assesses students are more efficient and rewarding than cop-like approaches that turn out negative for everyone.

Reshared post from +Alan Cann

"Last Fall, it was my first semester of teaching as a tenured professor. It was also the semester that I realized how pervasive cheating is in our courses. After spending a tremendous amount of time fighting and pursuing all the cheating cases, I decided that it makes no sense to fight it. The incentive structures simply do not reward such efforts. The Nash equilibrium is to let the students cheat and "perform well"; in exchange, I get back great evaluations. But let me give you the complete story, as it contains tidbits that I found, in retrospect, highly entertaining…"

(Hat tip https://plus.google.com/u/0/115667079219474375947/posts/RPKNj4EN7MN )

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Why I will never pursue cheating again – A Computer Scientist in a Business School
Why I will never pursue cheating again. Last Fall, it was my first semester of teaching as a tenured professor. It was also the semester that I realized how pervasive cheating is in our courses. After…

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